BEHAVIOR

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A case of polydipsia and inappropriate urination in a mongrel dog

Ivana Puglisi

Abstract


A 10-year-old mongrel castrated male dog of 16 Kg of weight was examined for polydipsia and inappropriate urination.

Polydipsia occurred at stressing events / periods or for apparent boredom, while inappropriate urination occurred even without clear external stimulation, in various areas of the home and at different times of the day and week.

The laboratory and ultrasound findings allowed to exclude a medical cause. The diminishing of polydipsia following behavioral interventions, allowed to diagnosticate a psychogenic polydipsia.

It was explained to the owners that the dog should not be punished when he carries out the undesirable behavior. It should rather identify when the dog is going to drink in order to anticipate and involved him in other activities The owner was instructed to prevent the stressful and conflict situations. A food supplement based on L-theanine (Anxitane®) for one month (4.5 mg/Kg BID for the first 7 days then 3 mg / Kg BID) was recommended.

Two weeks after the first visit and for the following months, there were no more episodes of polydipsia, so the water restriction program was not undertaken.

During this period, two episodes of excitement / emotional urination took place. It was decided to associate with Anxitane®, Adaptil® collar for one month.

Four months after the visit, the situation had not changed much: occasional urination from excitement in different environments and conflict urination / "submission" almost exclusively at home during the weekend. The owner, however, reported that the dog apparently had less control over the urinary sphincter. To date, the dog is not following any nutraceutical or pharmacological treatment, and the situation is under control (two to three episodes per month) with behavioral and environmental management. The owner is open to the possibility of undertaking drug treatment in the future.


Keywords


dog, polydipsia, inappropriate urination

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.4454/db.v5i3.99

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